Tennis Backhand

Two-Handed Backhand

If someone were to ask me which professional player had the best Two-Handed Backhand of all time, the first player to come to mind would be Andre Agassi. In fact, many professional players with great backhands have emulated their backhand after Agassi. Rafael Nadal, Andy Murray, Novak Djokovic, to name a few, have backhands very similar to Agassi. While their backhands vary slightly in terms of grip, topspin, etc., their body movements are all very similar.

Two-Handed Backhand Grip

  • The dominant hand is the hand on top. This hand is usually the non-dominant hand for all the other strokes.
  • Example: For a right-handed person, dominant hand would be the left hand; The right hand keeps the shot steady while the left hand generates the spin and power.
  • Non-dominant hand (right, if you’re right-handed) is a Continental Grip; Dominant hand (left, if you’re right-handed) is a Modified Eastern Grip.

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Tennis Backhand Guide: Front View

  1. Initiate shoulder turn while bringing the racquet head up and keeping the hand down; Right arm is straight throughout the swing to keep the shot consistent; The hands are about a foot away from the body.
  2. More shoulder turn into the pelvic “Lock” position; Right arm straight but not locked; Left arm slightly bent; Weight shifted towards the left leg.“L” shape is created with the arm and racquet position; Weight on the back foot ready to step forward and uncoil.
  3. Right foot about to land on the ground.
  4. Stepping forward; Moving weight forward; Racquet head starts to drop below the ball.
  5. Hip and Shoulder have rotated; Body is square to the net; Contact point is slightly passed the front foot.
  6. Left leg is off the ground and bent to counter the fast arm swing across the body; Weight is fully shifted forward; Left arm is extended straight.
  7. Right arm is bent to an “L” shape; Keeping the right elbow up before finishing the follow-through is very important for a body driven swing as opposed to an arm driven swing.
  8. Racquet finishes above the shoulder and behind the head; Left foot comes back down for balance.
  9. Racquet starts to drop getting ready for the next shot.

Tennis Backhand Guide: Back View

 

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2.  The left hip is rotating forward while the racquet snaps back creating the “monkey drum” affect. This will help with creating racquet head speed while staying relaxed. This is how the pros create so much power while remaining relaxed.

More About Backhand Strokes:

 


31 Responses to “Tennis Backhand”

  1. Nice work on explaining the backhand technique.

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    lockandrolltennis Reply:

    Thank You!

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  2. Thank you very much for the great tutorials and the awesome videos. I’m a new player and I’m now practising to master the One-Handed Backhand Topspin, and your site greatly helps me. :)

    Thank you again.

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    lockandrolltennis Reply:

    Thanks! Really appreciate your compliment. There is nothing like hitting a sweet one-handed backhand! Keep training.

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  3. Great site. Your 2 hand backhand is fluid but the one hander is not as much. I think in photo 5 your hands are too far away from your back hip at the start foward to the ball.

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    lockandrolltennis Reply:

    Thanks for the post. IMO, the distance from the hand to the hip is more of a preference. Some players like to keep it closer and some like it further. I like it a little bit further because it allows my arm to swing freely.

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  4. Thanks for the post. IMO, the distance from the hand to the hip is more of a preference. Some players like to keep it closer and some like it further. I like it a little bit further because it allows my arm to swing freely.

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  5. Excellent instruction video I have learned a lot from you and it has been helping me inprove my a great deal thank you very much.

    Regards,
    To Nguyen

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    lockandrolltennis Reply:

    My pleasure!

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  6. I’ve watched tons of videos from the fuzzy guys, but I gave those up when I discovered you. Love your instruction style and the monkey drum is genius.
    Question: You make a point of showing a cocked wrist as part of your backhand prep, but when in your swing do you straighten it out? What’s it contributing to the swing at impact? A lot or not much?

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  7. Awesome explanation. Good job.

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  8. Thank you for your excellent website. A question on the 2hander. Underneath the backview photographs, you explain that the key is in picture 2, which shows the racket snapping back before it snaps forward. I have trouble with that. Do you initiate that action with your wrist? Does it happen naturally as a result of a very loose grip?

    Thank you,

    Andy

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  9. Hey

    I love your site, its very informative! Great stuff

    I was wondering, whats your opinion on the one hand vs two hand backhand debate? People say pick the most natural one but what if both come easily to me?

    Thanks!

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  10. Hello from Penang, Malaysia. I stumbled onto your excellent and interesting videos on youtube.
    Well done and I look forward to more great videos on this site :-)

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  11. hi tae,
    i was wondering, is it possible to hit one of those scissor kick backhands with one hand??
    if so, please give a tutorial
    thanks

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  12. hey i have a few question for you
    1. which would you prefer? 1 handed or 2?
    2. which one is harder?
    3. i really want a 1 handed back hand and i started yesterday but i keep shanking the ball. i keep my eeyes on it and everything but its just so hard. i know you cant help me much without seeing me doing it first but any tips?

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  13. Thank you so much.
    Do you teach private classess?

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  14. I’ve been looking for a video on the one-handed topspin back hand. Thanks for a detailed explanation of the technique

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  15. Tank you for your teaching.
    It’s so easy. and it’s very good.

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  16. Hey! Your two – handed backhand video was a life-saver man! I’ve been playing for 2 and a half years and I used to wonder how those pros on TV used to hit those amazing double – handed backhands, while I never was able to, how much ever I tried ( that was until I saw your video ).

    Further, your scissor – cut backhand also was very helpful!

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  17. thanks. these videos are pretty helpful with the backhands.

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  18. i forgot to thank you for teaching me to do a proper backhand. i can just imagine me back then, hitting some weird backhand that would go out of the court.

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  19. Great! I’m learning a lot from you. I have successfully switched my backhand to 2hbh thanks to your lesson.

    [Reply]

    Tae Byon Reply:

    Glad I can help!

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  20. When I first learned tennis from my uncle, I was told that the racket face should be perpendicular to the ground and parallel to the net at point of contact.

    However, when I watch the pros play, I noticed their racket face sometimes are closed (not perpendicular to the ground). Are my eyes doing tricks on me that they swing too fast and I didn’t see it clearly?

    Plz clear up this myth for me cuz it always lures at the beck on my mind whenever I hit.

    P.s. Thx for your modern forehand video, I’m learning how to play semi-western topspin.

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  21. Hi tennis coach T . I like all most your drill and you practiced like PR.
    easy to understand.hope to receive more offen new drill for modern tennis
    thank T so much
    bach duong

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  22. I found the site by accident. As a certified PTR and MTMCA teaching Pro -I must admit I am impressed.
    Frankly, I am particularly impressed with the monkey drum- may I ask where could I purchase one.
    Also, I like the fact that you can “walk the talk” – yes, demonstrate the strokes in slow motion.
    Well done!

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  23. Thanks for sharing. Only by sharing knowledge does one grow, you seem to be following this great principle.

    It looks so simple with your explanation coupled with great images, so much practice required to make it repeatable and not fall back to bad habits. Also, unlearning bad practices that crop up in your game are tough to notice and correct.

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  24. You wrote:
    “Photo 5: Hip and Shoulder have rotated; Body is square to the net; Contact point is slightly passed the front foot.”

    Actually it is about photo number 6 :-)

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  25. By the way I appreciate a lot your web site.

    [Reply]


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